Florida Construction Cost Estimating
California
Call: (866)-493-4944
Write to us: enquiry@quantity-takeoff.com

The age old Canel is breeding hope for Californians

The Panama Canel, one of the great engineering examples across the world has completed its centenary in August 2014 – raised hope of Californians.

 

The completion of the colossal project in 1914 inspired Californians to throw two grand celebrations that refocused the world’s attention on the Golden State’s ‘promised land’ image. California’s ports, farms, and industries, would immediately reap the benefits of the enormous new shipping trade opened up by the canal.

 

The construction of the Panama Canal in the early 1900s completely captured the hearts and minds of Americans. After all, a project of this scale had not been seen since the transcontinental railroad joined the two coasts of the United States in 1869.

 

The construction of the Panama Canal in the early 1900s completely captured the hearts and minds of Americans. After all, a project of this scale had not been seen since the transcontinental railroad joined the two coasts of the United States in 1869.

Chinese invest waiting for California

The idea of building a canal across the narrow Isthmus of Panama had been considered since the mid-1500s, during the expansion of European trade routes to the Americas. Sailing merchants and government leaders knew that a canal across the 40-mile-wide isthmus would shorten the sea voyage around the treacherous Cape Horn of South America by nearly 8,000 miles. California’s gold rush in 1849 created an urgent need for a route across the isthmus.

 

In addition to the Panama Canal, several major projects in Southern California were coming to fruition in the early 1900s, and the residents were optimistic about their future.

 

An enormous project to establish and expand the port of Los Angeles at San Pedro Bay began in 1899, and the area was annexed into the city in 1909. The Los Angeles Aqueduct was completed in 1913, bringing a huge supply of Owens River water to parched Southern California farms and homes. Railroads were expanding across the region, and new lines were extended to the ports of Los Angeles and San Diego.

 

In the Orange Belt of the inland valleys, growers, businessmen, and the general public, were excited about the new improvements. Most viewed the opening of the Panama Canal as a key component to boosting their local economies.

 

As progress on the canal moved forward, the cities of San Diego and San Francisco decided to capitalize on the grand opening.

 

The Panama Canal was formally opened on Aug. 15, 1914, with the cargo ship SS Ancon holding the honor of the first official passage. The United States spent nearly $375 million to complete the project which equates to approximately $8.9 billion in 2014 dollars. An estimated 5,600 workers died of diseases and accidents during the U.S. construction of the canal.

 

100 years after its completion, the Panama Canal still provides a crucial shipping lane between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Upgrades and improvements have been ongoing, and a major new $5.25 billion dollar expansion project is expected to be complete in 2015.

Site Design & Develop by

Global Associates

Join Our Email List